AU Museum at Katzen Late Fall Opening Reception, November 9 from 6-9pm

The AU Museum at Katzen Arts Center will host its Late Fall Opening Reception this Saturday, November 9 from 6-9pm. This free event is a great opportunity to mingle with artists, curators, patrons, and the AU art community, and to celebrate the five new exhibitions opening this week at the museum: Radical Link: A New Community of Women, 1855-2020, Christine Neill: Observations from the Valley Floor, fair is foul & foul is fair, ARCADIA: The Clyde’s Murals by William Woodward, and Dark World: Photographs by Frank Hallam Day

fair is foul & foul is fair is a double exhibition by Irish contemporary artists Alice Maher and Aideen Barry. This exhibition takes up various tropes of “fair” and “foul” and transforms them into visual provocations as a way of bringing “an individual, stinging humour and critique to [the artist’s] investigations of hybridity, carnality, and social politics in historical time.” The artists will discuss their exhibition during a free gallery talk at 5pm in the AU Museum, just prior to the public opening (RSVP required). This panel will include the artists as well as Emer Rocke, Deputy Head of Mission of the Embassy of Ireland, Kate Meenan-Waugh, co-chair of Solas Nua, and Jack Rasmussen, Director and Curator of the American University Museum.

 

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Michal Heiman, Still from Plate 34 Line, London, 2016. Film, 22 min. Courtesy of the artist.

Multi-media artist Michal Heiman’s latest project Radical Link: A New Community of Women, 1855-2020 “extend[s] solidarity to those who engage in acts of resistance by creating a new community.” Curated by Sarah Gordon of the Washington DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the exhibition examines institutional practices of asylum, race, gender, time, and geographical space. Heiman studies neglected histories, specifically histories of women to ask questions about identity as it appears in visual art and critiques the role of archives in creating narratives for/of women’s histories. The Tel-Aviv-based artist will be present in the galleries from November 9th through 12th with her work. Heiman will also participate in AU’s Refugees & Asylum Seekers in Israel Conference.

 

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Christine Neill, Disappearing Cavendish, 2017. Watercolor and archival ink print on paper and framing Plexiglas, 31 x 44 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary. Photography by John Dean.

The exhibition Christine Neill: Observations from the Valley Floor, presented by the Alper Initiative for Washington Art and curated by Mollie Salah of the National Gallery, is an exhibition of the “motifs of biological examination with visual processes and techniques.” Neill is currently a professor at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, and her practice investigates the effects of environmental change on both human life and natural habitat. 

 

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William Woodward, Arcadia (Panel Three detail), 1980. Oil on linen mounted to panels, 5 x 72 ft. Courtesy of Katherine Neville.

 

ARCADIA: The Clyde’s Murals by William Woodward displays the 72-foot mural designed for  Clyde’s Restaurant located in Tyson’s Corner, Virginia. The eleven panels evoke, according to the artist, “a landscape of pure painterly invention, a lost world that has inspired poets, artists, and musicians since antiquity.” Woodward studied at American University and the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence, Italy and later directed George Washington University’s MFA program in Studio Arts for 37 years. 

 

 

 

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Frank Hallam Day, Girl in Wires, 2016. Archival pigment print, 24 x 36 in. Courtesy of the artist and Addison/Ripley Fine Art.

Dark World: Photographs by Frank Hallam Day is an exhibition of nighttime photographs by DC-based fine art photographer Frank Hallam Day. The show combines images from multiple periods within Day’s oeuvre, and spans over twelve years and many geographical locations including Bangkok, Berline, New York, Cambodia, and Myanmar. The dark photographs “are mysterious, unsettling, and examine the uncertainties, ambiguities, and possibilities of photographs shot at night and with unusual and sometimes unexpected light sources.” Day will be present to discuss his photography at a gallery talk at the museum, which will be held on November 16 at 3pm. While the event is free, due to limited space, an RSVP is required. 

 

Thank you to the AU Museum, artists, curators, and patrons for such an exciting and thought-provoking late fall exhibition line-up! We look forward to seeing you in the galleries!

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